Demolished

The Minneapolis Industrial Exposition

Minneapolis’ most prominent citizens were shocked when they learned that the Minnesota State Fair chose to take up permanent residence St. Paul. After the announcement was made, these citizens sprung into action to plan...

Upper Post of Fort Snelling: Quartermaster’s Shops

A construction boom took place in the upper post of Fort Snelling when the Department of the Dakota moved its headquarters to the fort in 1879. Building 63 was originally constructed to house the...

The Brickyards of Coon Rapids

The first road through Anoka County was established in 1835 to aid those traveling between Minneapolis and Anoka. The road was commonly known as the Red River Ox Cart Trail, now East River Road...

Secret Ruins Give Clues to an Opulent Past

Before Summit Avenue became a magnet for the state’s empire builders, St. Paul’s elite built their estates in the Sherburne Hill neighborhood (known today as Capitol Heights.) By the time construction on the State...

Demolished Homes of the Mayo Brothers

William J Mayo was the older of the two Mayo brothers who, along with five partners, founded the not-for-profit Mayo Clinic in Rochester. William was the more serious of the two brothers and was...

Wonderland’s Glass Castles

At the turn of the 20th century, urban amusement parks were a popular form of communal entertainment. Throughout the country, parks modeled after Coney Island in New York were popping up in most major...

Mr. Weatherball

When the Weatherball is glowing red, warmer weather’s just ahead. When the Weatherball is shining white, colder weather is in sight. When the Weatherball is wearing green, no weather changes are foreseen. Colors blinking...

Taconite Harbor: Lake Superior’s Ghost Town

In 1957, trucks loaded with prefabricated homes rolled along Highway 61 toward a new building site just south of Schroeder. By 1990, the homes were leaving the same way they arrived. In the 1950s,...

Aberdeen Hotel: The Grandest Apartment Hotel in St. Paul

The Aberdeen Hotel may not have been the first luxury apartment hotel in the Twin Cities, but it was undeniably the grandest of them all. Constructed in 1889 for $250,000, the hotel was located just...

A Grand Estate for the Owners of Watkins

As preservationists approached Rockledge, the home’s owner, Ernest L. King Jr., shuffled to the front door and yelled, “I’m tearing it down and there’s nothing you can do about it.” Mr. King had no...

The Rise of the Selby Avenue Streetcar Line

 As the population of St. Paul grew, people began moving out of the city’s core and into quieter, cleaner residential areas west of downtown. One of the most popular areas to live in the...

The Metropolitan Hotel in St. Paul

Constructed in 1869-70, the Metropolitan Hotel once stood at the corner of Washington and Third Street in St. Paul. On June 27, 1870, proprietor Gilbert Dutcher opened the hotel in grand style and for...

The End of the Line: Wildwood Amusement Park

Take any car for Wildwood at Wabasha and 7th Streets. Fare to Wildwood, each way, 15 cents; time, 40 minutes; distance, 12 miles. Past North St. Paul and Silver Lake, with pretty farms and...

Walker Art Center’s Idea House

The Walker Art Center’s Idea Houses I and II were the first fully-functional homes built by a museum in the United States. Rather than selling a product, the houses were built to promote cutting-edge...

A Turn of the Century Trestle in Akeley

If you travel north on Highway 64 through central Minnesota, you will likely pass through Akeley. It is a small town of about 400 residents and nearly as many lakes. Today, it’s hard to...