Posts in St- Paul & Suburbs
Sibley Historic Site in Mendota

Over Memorial Day weekend, I was lucky enough to attend the pre-grand opening of the Sibley Historic Site in Mendota with several of my DAR friends. After a brief reception, we were given a private tour of the buildings at the site while reenactors from the fur trade era set up tents and replicas of a birchbark canoe and bateau on the

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The Gates of Stonebridge

In 1907, St. Paul businessman and inventor Oliver Crosby purchased twenty-eight acres of land on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River in St. Paul. There, he built a twenty thousand square foot brick estate that he called Stonebridge. In his book Once There Were Castles, author Larry Millett claims that Stonebridge was "the greatest

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National Duties

On September 2, 1901, Vice President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech titled "National Duties" to 10,000 people at the Grandstand of the Minnesota State Fair. The speech was the first time Roosevelt used his famous line, “Speak softly and carry a big stick” in a public address. Four days after Roosevelt spoke at the fair, President McKinley was

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James J. Hill's North Oaks Farm

James J. Hill was the preeminent transportation pioneer in the American Northwest. He arrived in St. Paul, Minnesota on a steamboat in 1856 and planned on becoming a trapper and trader. Instead, he found work with a steamboat company. During the Civil War, Hill learned the business of buying, selling, and transporting goods. Through

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Wilder Public Baths

It's hard to imagine a time when taking a bath or shower in your own home wasn’t possible, but the convenience of showering on a regular basis is a modern luxury. One hundred years ago, many working-class homes in St. Paul lacked bathing facilities. People living in rooming houses and along the Mississippi flats didn’t even have running

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Hamm's Homes of Sky Blue Waters

All of Theodore and Louise Hamm’s children stayed close to their family home and business. Most built their own homes within a few blocks of the Hamm mansion and brewery at the bottom of the hill. Along with the Hamm family, many of the workers from the brewery also lived on top of the hill. The workers were all able to make the short walk to

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St. Paul's Oakland Cemetery

On the darkest night in St. Paul, the living and the dead would come together in Jackson Woods. Here, the living would offer their final goodbyes to their loved ones before burying them in an unmarked grave under a canopy of old oak trees. Much to the chagrin of Mr. Jackson, his wooded paradise on the northern edge of St. Paul had

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The Rise of the Selby Avenue Streetcar Line

As the population of St. Paul grew, people began moving out of the city's core and into quieter, cleaner residential areas west of downtown. One of the most popular areas to live in the late 1800s was the St. Anthony Hill (now known as Cathedral Hill) area. People still needed to get from their homes on top of the hill, to the offices, factories, and shops

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The Metropolitan Hotel in St. Paul

Constructed in 1869-70, the Metropolitan Hotel once stood at the corner of Washington and Third Street in St. Paul. On June 27, 1870, proprietor Gilbert Dutcher opened the hotel in grand style and for many years the Metropolitan was identified as St. Paul’s premier hotel. Prominent local businessmen and out-of-town movers and shakers would

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