Posts in Minneapolis & Suburbs
Who the Heck Was Eloise Butler?

Eloise Butler’s interest in the natural world began when her aunt taught her how to identify the plants in home state of Maine. After graduating college, Butler began teaching high school botany before moving to Minneapolis in 1874 to teach at Central School. In addition to teaching, she continued her own studies by taking courses at the University of Minnesota.

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District #28 School in Ramsey

The District #28 School was constructed in Ramsey in 1892 to replace a smaller, wood frame school house. Buff-colored bricks manufactured by the nearby Kelsey Brickyard cover the exterior of the school. Inside, one large classroom dominates the space. It has a pressed metal ceiling and chalkboards covering the walls. All windows and the original

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Frank E. Little Mansion in Minneapolis

Frank E. Little was a partner in a Minneapolis-based real estate firm. He didn’t leave behind much of a legacy in the city he called home, but this architectural rendering of his mansion near Loring Park proves that he did alright for himself. Little’s home was located at 1414 Harmon Place—about halfway between Spruce and Willow. Built in 1889

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Terrace Theatre in Robbinsdale

Located in Robbinsdale, the international-style Terrace Theatre opened on May 23, 1951. At the time, it was one of the most luxurious and modern theaters in the country. The lobby was an ultramodern gem with large windows, metallic fixtures, and a sunken den complete with fireplace. A television lounge and nursery rooms for mothers with

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Schmid Farmhouse Ruins

The Schmid Farmhouse is located on a hill above Lake Minnetonka. It was constructed in 1876 by German immigrants Joseph and Benedict Schmid. Although Benedict was known to have lived in the home at one time, Joseph and his family spent the most time living and working on the 156-acre farm. Their livestock included

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The Eight Days in May Protests

For many at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities campus, May 9, 1972 started out like any other day. The weather was much cooler than normal, so students rushed to and from their classes. The buzz on campus concerned President Nixon’s announcement that the United States would lay mines in North Vietnam's Haiphong Harbor in an

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Lilac Way: Showcase of the Belt Line

Although it’s difficult to tell now, Highway 100 in the west metro was once one of the most beautiful and serene roads in the nation. The roadway was conceived just after the start of the Great Depression as a joint venture between the National Recovery Work Relief Program (which would later become the Works Progress Administration) and the

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The Minneapolis Industrial Exposition

Minneapolis’ most prominent citizens were shocked when they learned that the Minnesota State Fair chose to take up permanent residence in St. Paul. Shortly after the official announcement was made, Minneapolitans sprang into action. Their plan was to create a fair in Minneapolis to rival the one in St. Paul. In 1885, an idea was born to create an

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The Brickyards of Coon Rapids

The first road through Anoka County was established in 1835 to aid those traveling between Minneapolis and Anoka. The road was commonly known as the Red River Ox Cart Trail, now East River Road and Coon Rapids Boulevard, followed the Mississippi River north before turning toward Anoka. The journey took about two days by horse or

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