Posts in Minneapolis & Suburbs
The Minneapolis Industrial Exposition

Minneapolis’ most prominent citizens were shocked when they learned that the Minnesota State Fair chose to take up permanent residence in St. Paul. Shortly after the official announcement was made, Minneapolitans sprang into action. Their plan was to create a fair in Minneapolis to rival the one in St. Paul. In 1885, an idea was born to create an

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The Brickyards of Coon Rapids

The first road through Anoka County was established in 1835 to aid those traveling between Minneapolis and Anoka. The road was commonly known as the Red River Ox Cart Trail, now East River Road and Coon Rapids Boulevard, followed the Mississippi River north before turning toward Anoka. The journey took about two days by horse or

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The Weatherball in Minneapolis

On Thanksgiving Day in 1982, Minneapolis lost one of its most enduring landmarks--the Weatherball. It was perched atop the 14-story Northwestern National Bank building at 600 Marquette Avenue for 33 years. The Weatherball could be seen from 15 miles away at night, so there was no excuse for weather-cautious Minneapolitans to be caught unaware.

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Tangletown's Guardians of Health

The Washburn water tower sits on a hill in the heart of the Washburn Park (commonly known as Tangletown) neighborhood. It is surrounded by winding city streets and picturesque south Minneapolis homes. This area is hardly forgotten --quite the opposite really. However, it is a perfect representation of something which is often forgotten. A

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The Original Plan for the Anoka Asylum

The serene group of cottages around a horseshoe-shaped drive that we see today was not the first plan for the new asylum in Anoka. The original architect, Warren B. Dunnell, had a different vision for the site. Dunnell, a Minneapolis-based architect, was probably best known as the architect of the Fergus Falls State Hospital, the State School for

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Maple Hill Cemetery

Dedicated in 1857, the rolling slopes of Maple Hill became the final resting place of early settlers of Minneapolis and Civil War veterans. Over the next 30 years, more than 5,000 bodies were buried in the cemetery. Because little thought was given to the ongoing maintenance and care of the cemetery, the grounds quickly fell into disrepair. By 1894,

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Walker Art Center's Idea House

The Walker Art Center's Idea Houses I and II were the first fully-functional homes built by a museum in the United States. Rather than selling a product, the houses were built to promote cutting-edge ideas in modern home design and the possibilities of the future. Idea House I was constructed in 1941--the height of an extreme housing shortage

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